5 Reasons to use Twitter to Build Your PLN


I started using Twitter to connect with other educators and build my Personal Learning Network (PLN) because a colleague of mine kept talking about how she was learning and connecting with other educators. She got me to Twitter, but here's why I stayed...

  1. Cheer on your awesome moments- It's fun to share the awesome things that you are doing with other educators around the world and get feedback from them. Other educators can learn from what you are doing and it gives you a chance to celebrate your success!
  2. Send out an SOS when you need advice- Sometimes teaching can be very lonely, despite how many kids are in our classrooms. It is easy to feel like the only one in using a particular method or activity. Having a network beyond your brick and mortar building allows you to reach out to other educators for assistance when you don't know who to ask.
  3. Stay in touch after conferences- I love traveling for conferences and have met some really cool people along the way. When I attend a session, the presenter frequently includes their twitter handle on their slides. This is a great way to ask the presenter questions, follow their blog posts, and learn from their best practices.
  4. Learn about cool new tools- I recently starting using FlipGrid in my classes (which if you haven't tried yet, you should definitely give it a shot!) I heard about FlipGrid on Twitter as #FlipGridFever broke out over the summer. Seeing so many innovative teachers share this tool made me want to try it and I am so glad I did!
  5. Get your #edchat on- Participating in chats is a great way to meet other educators that are interested in a particular topic and to converse with other educators. They are at a scheduled time and use a #hashtag to make it easy to follow the conversation. Some of my favorite chats are #delachat, #istechat, #edtech, and #scichat. 
Start building your PLN today! Follow me @KammasKersch

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