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Modeling Grit

Over the last few years, grit has become a buzzword in the education community and beyond, largely due to Angela Duckworth's amazing work. On her website she defines grit as "passion and perseverance for long term goals." Check out her website for more information on Grit and watch her TED talk here.

As teachers, I think we know how to recognize grit when we see it in our students. We see it when a student continues to work their hardest, despite challenges outside of school. We see it when a struggling student doesn't give up and masters a tough concept. We see it when students who felt like the world was against them walk the stage at graduation.

While we know how to recognize grit, do we know how to be gritty ourselves?

Teachers know the importance of modeling. We do it everyday. We model how to walk quietly in the hallway, how to speak nicely to others, how to solve a math problem on the board, and how to write a proper paragraph... but do we model grit?

Do we let our students see us pushing ourselves towards longterm, multiyear goals? Do we let them see our don't-give-up attitude when we are exhausted and ready to quit? Do we share with them how we fail and continue on?

Relationships are crucial in our profession. We build relationships with students and their families everyday by educating them about content, citizenship, and life skills. It is important for our students to see us as show the same grit that we hope to help them cultivate.

I challenge you to be gritty.



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